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Title: Heart Of The Congo

Review Date: March 31, 2006

Year Of Release: 2005

Rating: PG-13

Running Time: 60 Minutes

Box Office Gross: N/A 

Recommendation: Great documentary about charity work.

Site Rating: 8 out of 10 stars

A few months ago I saw Tom Weidlinger’s award winning “Heart of the Congo.” It is a wonderful documentary. It illustrated the human capacity for love and charity. It also further dispels the notion that one person can’t make a difference. The offical website synopsis states: 

“In the heart of the Congo, at the end of a war, a handful of aid workers help refugees who have lost everything. They mobilize villagers to dig wells for clean water, train health workers, and nurse children with acute malnutrition back to health. They are confronted with threats of violence from roving militias, systemic corruption, and a legacy of colonial dependency. And there are times when it is very clear that these workers exist apart from those they aim to help, benefiting from services and luxuries of the modern world that are beyond the reach of the rural Congolese.”

The doco circles around aid workers who gave their time and labor in assisting to build up economically challenged areas of the Congo region. Yes, one person can make a difference. 

The most fascinating of all was, Mariona, a white female aid worker. She did not scorn the black, poverty ravaged children. She was kind to them and embraced them as though they were her own. She really appears to be someone who believes in what she does. You have to admire people like that. Her partner David was thrilled with his charity contributions as well.

It was an excellent film. Worthy projects such as these should be the recipients of better funding and awards. Yet amazingly, films like these sometimes struggle to be made, due to lack of funding.

In the documentary, they got a well working to provide the village with clean drinking water. Something so simple most of us take for granted was a triumph for them.

No matter who you are in any country you've lived for a long time with modern conveniences such as clean, running tap water, we tend to take things like that for granted. This film reminded me of that. We come to expect as basics what others consider luxuries.

We all have our problems, but we still have much to be thankful to God for.

 


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